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Singara Recipe | Bengali Shingara » Dassana’s Veg Recipes


For any other person, a samosa, when travels to the land of Bengal, takes the form of a Shingara. But try saying that to a Bengali, they may take offense in it. Of course, some similarities between the two do exist, but for a Bengali person, a Singara is another emotion in itself. And they really may not argue on this, any further. Here’s my version of this famous tea time snack with a vegetable stuffing of aloo (potato), phulkopi (cauliflower) and matar (green peas).

singara served on a butter paper kept in an iron kadai with fried green chilies, a small bowl of chutney kept on the top side and text layovers.singara served on a butter paper kept in an iron kadai with fried green chilies, a small bowl of chutney kept on the top side and text layovers.

Singara vs Samosa

It can be rightly said that the Singara is a prized possession for a Bengali. More so, when it is the Aloo Phulkopir Shingara, which is simply the one stuffed with a specially spiced mixture of potatoes and cauliflower.

Since, even the samosa’s origin is believed to be in Central Asia and not particularly India, the Bengal one is also a variation just like the Punjabi or other North Indian ones.

While the process of making a Singara may be same as that of a Punjabi Samosa, but the flavors are completely different. So, if you are expecting the taste of a Punjabi samosa in a Shingara, then its definitely not going to be met.

More differences include:

  • Unlike the faint tanginess present in a regular samosa, there’s a hint of sweetness, crunchiness from the peanuts and an earthiness from the cauliflower and potatoes in a Singara.
  • While a samosa usually has a thicker outer covering, a classic Singara primarily has a thin, flaky covering. The Bengali stuffings can range from the vegetarian aloo-phulkopi to even a non-vegetarian one.
  • The size of the Shingara is generally smaller than that of a samosa. It is also a lighter and crispier puff pastry as compared to samosas.
  • However, shaping Singara in its signature style requires as much effort and precision as shaping its Punjabi counterpart.

About Singara Recipe

Aloo Phulkopir Singara is usually a winter specialty in Bengal due to the arrival of fresh seasonal produce like cauliflower and green peas. Thus, these go in the preparation of the filling of the much-celebrated Shingara. In this recipe, you can skip both cauliflower and green peas, and add more potatoes instead.

I have used the traditional Bengali mix of 5 spices called panch phoron in this recipe. This spice blend is composed of wild celery seeds (radhuni), fenugreek seeds (methi), fennel seeds (saunf), nigella seeds (kalonji) and cumin seeds (jeera).

In case you don’t have the panch phoron, just add a pinch each of these 5 spices. In case you’re finding it difficult to source the radhuni, add mustard seeds (rai/sarson) or carom seeds (ajwain) instead. Or better, prepare this spice mix by referring to this Panch Phoron recipe.

shingara served on a butter paper kept in an iron kadai with fried green chilies, a small bowl of chutney kept on the top side and text layover. shingara served on a butter paper kept in an iron kadai with fried green chilies, a small bowl of chutney kept on the top side and text layover.

Just like the samosa, a Singara is deep fried too. But you can bake or air fry it too. If baking the Shingara, check the method on how to go about it in this Samosa Recipe.

Making the Singara does take some time and efforts. This recipe yields about 14 Shingara, you can halve or double the recipe if you wish to.

Serving Aloo Phulkopir Shingara, alongside some green chutney, tamarind chutney or mint coriander chutney, as an evening snack is the best thing you can do. You can also have it with some fried green chilies.

Step-by-Step Guide

How to make Singara

Prep Vegetables

1. Rinse and then chop 150 grams cauliflower in tiny or small florets. You will need 1.5 cups small cauliflower florets.

chopped cauliflower florets for shingara. chopped cauliflower florets for shingara.

2. Rinse 1 cup fresh green peas and keep aside.

rinsed fresh green peas for shingara. rinsed fresh green peas for shingara.

3. Rinse, peel and chop 225 grams (3 medium) potatoes in small cubes. You will need 1.25 cups small potato cubes.

potatoes chopped into small cubes for shingara. potatoes chopped into small cubes for shingara.

Make Stuffing

4. Heat 1 tablespoon oil in a pan. Add ½ teaspoon panch phoran.

In case you do not have panch phoran, add a pinch of each the following spices:

  • fenugreek seeds (methi)
  • wild celery seeds (radhuni)
  • fennel seeds, cumin seeds
  • nigella seeds (kalonji) – instead of wild celery seeds (radhuni), you can use carom seeds (ajwain) or mustard seeds (rai).
panch phoron added to hot oil in pan. panch phoron added to hot oil in pan.

5. Fry the panch phoron on low heat till the spices turn aromatic and splutter.

frying panch phoron in hot oil. frying panch phoron in hot oil.

6. Next add ⅓ cup chopped onions.

chopped onions added to the oil. chopped onions added to the oil.

7. Stir and sauté till the onions soften and turn translucent.

sautéing onions. sautéing onions.

8. Then, add 1 teaspoon ginger paste. Mix and sauté till the raw aroma of the ginger goes away.

ginger paste added to the onions. ginger paste added to the onions.

9. Keep the heat to low, add ¼ teaspoon turmeric powder, ½ teaspoon Kashmiri red chili powder, ½ teaspoon coriander powder and ½ teaspoon cumin powder.

spice powders added to the onions. spice powders added to the onions.

10. Mix very well and sauté for a few seconds.

sautéing spiced onion mixture. sautéing spiced onion mixture.

11. Add the chopped potatoes.

chopped potatoes added to the onions. chopped potatoes added to the onions.

12. Mix and sauté for 1 minute.

sautéing potatoes with the onion mixture. sautéing potatoes with the onion mixture.

13. Then, add the chopped cauliflower and green peas.

chopped cauliflower and green peas added to the potato-onion mixture. chopped cauliflower and green peas added to the potato-onion mixture.

14. Season with salt as per taste.

salt added to the pan. salt added to the pan.

15. Mix very well.

ingredients mixed well. ingredients mixed well.

16. Add 4 to 5 tablespoons water and mix again.

adding water to the mixed vegetable mixture. adding water to the mixed vegetable mixture.

17. Cover the pan with a lid and simmer the vegetables on low to medium-low heat.

simmering vegetables in covered pan. simmering vegetables in covered pan.

18. In between, check. If the vegetables start sticking to the pan, add a few more tablespoons of water.

simmering vegetables in pan. simmering vegetables in pan.

19. Simmer till the vegetables are tender and cooked. Then, switch off the heat. Just cook the vegetables till tender. Do not make them mushy or overcook them.

cooked vegetable mixture. cooked vegetable mixture.

20. Add 3 tablespoons roasted peanuts or salted peanuts and ¼ teaspoon sugar.

roasted peanuts and sugar added to the cooked vegetable mixture. roasted peanuts and sugar added to the cooked vegetable mixture.

21. Mix well and let this stuffing cool to room temperature.

ingredients mixed well in the cooked vegetable stuffing. ingredients mixed well in the cooked vegetable stuffing.

Make Singara Dough

22. In a large parat (plate) or a bowl, take 2 cups all-purpose flour. Add 4 tablespoons oil and 1 teaspoon salt or as required.

all purpose flour, oil and salt added to a large plate. all purpose flour, oil and salt added to a large plate.

23. Mix the oil in the flour with your fingertips till you get a breadcrumb like texture in the flour.

oil and salt mixed with the flour to get a breadcrumb like texture. oil and salt mixed with the flour to get a breadcrumb like texture.

24. When you press a portion of the mixture in your palm, it should hold together and not crumble.

pressing a portion of the mixture to check whether it is holding together or crumbling. pressing a portion of the mixture to check whether it is holding together or crumbling.

25. No, add ½ to ⅔ cup water or as required. Add water in parts.

adding water in parts. adding water in parts.

26. Knead to a smooth dough. The dough should be smooth but firm or tight. It should not be soft.

Cover the dough with a moist cloth or kitchen napkin and allow to rest for 30 minutes.

ingredients kneaded to a smooth and slightly firm dough. ingredients kneaded to a smooth and slightly firm dough.

27. After 30 minutes, lightly knead the dough again and make a log. Cut the dough log in equal pieces. Cover the pieces with a moist cloth or kitchen napkin.

dough log cut into 6 pieces. dough log cut into 6 pieces.

Shaping Singara

28. Take one dough piece and roll in a ball. Flatten and keep on the rolling board.

one dough ball. one dough ball.

29. With a rolling pin, roll to a 7 to 8 inches disc.

dough ball rolled into a disc. dough ball rolled into a disc.

30. Cut the rolled dough from the center.

dough disc cut into halves from the center. dough disc cut into halves from the center.

31. Now, with your fingertip or with a small brush, spread water on the edges of one of the cut dough.

water spread on the edges of one half. water spread on the edges of one half.

32. Bring together the straight edge with one of its end overlapping a bit the other end. Press and seal the edges. Press the edges well, so that they get sealed. It will look like a cone.

dough shaped into a cone.dough shaped into a cone.

33. Now with a small spoon, fill the cone with the prepared stuffing. Remember not to underfill or overfill with the veggie stuffing.

prepared stuffing filled in the prepared cone. prepared stuffing filled in the prepared cone.

34. Pinch a part on the edge as shown in the picture below. This helps the singaras to stand when placed on a tray.

a part pinched on the edge of the cone. a part pinched on the edge of the cone.

35. Press both the edges. Be sure there are no cracks. The edges should be joined very well.

edges of the stuffed cone joined well. edges of the stuffed cone joined well.

36. Make all shingaras this way. Cover with a moist cloth or kitchen napkin before you begin to fry them.

prepared shingara on a plate. prepared shingara on a plate.

Deep Frying Singara

37. Heat oil for deep frying in a kadai on medium flame. Add a small piece of the dough and it should come up gradually and steadily.

checking the temperature of the oil kept for deep frying in a kadai. checking the temperature of the oil kept for deep frying in a kadai.

38. When the oil is moderately hot, gently place the prepared Singara in the hot oil.

prepared shingar added in the hot oil. prepared shingar added in the hot oil.

39. Add 2 to 3 or 4 singara depending on the size of the kadai.

frying shingara in hot oil. frying shingara in hot oil.

40. Once the singara are added, then lower the heat.

frying shingara in hot oil. frying shingara in hot oil.

41. Begin to fry them on low to medium-low heat.

frying shingara in hot oil. frying shingara in hot oil.

42. When one side is light golden, turn over.

shingara turned over while frying. shingara turned over while frying.

43. Continue to fry and when the second side is light golden, turn over again.

shingara turned over again while frying. shingara turned over again while frying.

44. This way keep on turning them and frying till they have a nice golden crust.

frying shingara till golden. frying shingara till golden.

45. Remove with a slotted spoon, draining the extra oil.

removing fried shingara with a slotted spoon. removing fried shingara with a slotted spoon.

46. Place them on kitchen paper towels to absorb extra oil. While frying other pieces, slightly increase the heat. Add them and again reduce the heat.

fried shingara on a kitchen paper towel. fried shingara on a kitchen paper towel.

47. Serve Aloo Phulkopir Shingara hot or warm with some fried salted green chillies, green chutney, tamarind chutney or mint coriander chutney.

shingara served on a butter paper kept in an iron kadai with fried green chilies, a small bowl of chutney kept on the top side and text layovers. shingara served on a butter paper kept in an iron kadai with fried green chilies, a small bowl of chutney kept on the top side and text layovers.

FAQs

What is samosa known in West Bengal?

It is usually called as Shingara or Singara. But, is different than the Punjabi samosa.

How do you make the crust for a Bengali Singara?

Take about 2 cups all-purpose flour (maida) in a large plate or parat. Add 4 tablespoons oil and 1 teaspoon salt to it. Use your fingertips to mix till a breadcrumb like texture is achieved.

Press and check, the mixture should not crumble. Then, start adding ½ to ⅔ cup water in parts, and knead to a smooth, but slightly firm dough.

This dough has to be covered with a damp cloth and kept to rest for 30 minutes. After this time, lightly knead it once again and make a log. Divide into equal portions and cover with a moist cloth until ready to stuff.

How is a Singara different than samosa?

Singara and samosa are close related, but definitely not similar. The main differences are: Shingara has a sweeter and crunchier filling as compared to the slightly tangy filling of samosas.

Samosas are usually larger in size than their Bengali counterpart and singaras usually have a thin, flaky outer crust versus the thicker outer crust of samosas.

More Bengali Snack Recipes To Try!

Please be sure to rate the recipe in the recipe card or leave a comment below if you have made it. For more veetarian inspirations, Sign Up for my emails or follow me on Instagram, Youtube, Facebook, Pinterest or Twitter.

singara recipe, aloo phulkopir singara recipe, bengali samosa recipesingara recipe, aloo phulkopir singara recipe, bengali samosa recipe

Singara Recipe | Bengali Shingara

Singara also known as Shingara is a popular tea time snack from Bengal. The stuffing for the vegetarian version of Singara is made from potatoes or cauliflower, potatoes and green peas.

Prep Time 45 mins

Cook Time 30 mins

Total Time 1 hr 15 mins

For the vegetable stuffing

Prevent your screen from going dark while making the recipe

Preparation

  • Rinse and then cauliflower in tiny or small florets. You will need 1.5 cups chopped small cauliflower florets.

  • Rinse fresh green peas with water a few times and keep aside.

  • Rinse, peel and chop the potatoes in small cubes. You will need 1.25 cups chopped small potato cubes.

Making vegetable filling

  • Heat 1 tablespoon oil in a pan. Add ½ teaspoon panch phoron.

  • On a low heat, let the spices become aromatic and splutter.

  • Now add finely chopped onions. Stir and saute till the onions soften and turn translucent.

  • Then add ginger paste. Mix and sauté fo a few seconds or till the raw aroma of ginger goes away.

  • Then add turmeric powder, kashmiri red chilli powder, coriander powder and cumin powder. Mix very well and saute for a few seconds on low heat.

  • Add the chopped potatoes. Mix and sauté for 1 minute.

  • Then add the chopped cauliflower and green peas. Season with salt as per taste. Mix very well.

  • Add 4 to 5 tablespoons water and mix again.

  • Cover the pan with a lid and simmer the veggies on a low to medium-low heat.

  • In between do check and if the veggies start sticking to the pan, then add a few more tablespoons of water.

  • Simmer till the veggies are tender and cooked. Then turn off the heat. Just cook the veggies till fork tender. Do not make them mushy or overcook them.

  • Then add roasted peanuts or salted peanuts. Also add sugar.

  • Mix well and let this aloo phulkopir stuffing cool at room temperature.

Making singara dough

  • In a large parat (plate) or a bowl take all-purpose flour (maida). Add 4 tablespoons oil and 1 teaspoon salt or add as required.

  • Mix the oil in the flour with your fingertips till you get a bread crumb like consistency in the flour.

  • When you press a portion of the mixture in your palm, it should hold together and not crumble.

  • Now add ½ to ⅔ cup water or add as required. Add water in parts.

  • Knead to a smooth dough. The dough should be smooth but firm or tight. It should not be soft.

  • Cover the dough with a moist cloth or kitchen napkin and allow to rest for 30 minutes.

  • After 30 minutes, lightly knead the dough again and make a log. Cut the dough log in 7 equal pieces.

  • Cover the pieces with a moist cloth or kitchen napkin.

Stuffing and shaping singara

  • Take one dough piece and roll in a ball. Flatten and keep on the rolling board.

  • With a rolling pin roll to a 7 to 8 inches round.

  • Cut the rolled dough from the center. Now with your fingertip or with a small brush spread water on the edges of one of the cut dough.

  • Bring together the straight edge with one of its end overlapping a bit the other end. Press and seal the edges. Press the edges well, so that they get sealed. It will look like a cone.
  • Now with a small spoon, stuff the potato filling in the samosa cone.

  • Pinch a part in the edge and press both the sides. This helps the singara to stand when placed on a tray.

  • Make sure there are no cracks. The edges should be joined very well.

  • Make all singara this way. Cover them with a moist cloth or kitchen napkin before you begin to fry them.

Frying singara

  • Heat oil for deep frying in a kadai on medium flame. Add a small piece of the dough and it should come up gradually and steadily.

  • Now gently add the singara in the moderately hot oil. Add 2 to 3 or 4 shingara depending on the size of the kadai.

  • Once all the singaras are added, then lower the heat. Begin to fry them on a low to medium-low heat.

  • When one side is light golden then turn over each singara.

  • Continue to fry and when the second side is light golden, turn over again.

  • This way keep on turning them and fry till they have a nice golden crust.

  • Remove with a slotted spoon draining the extra oil.

  • Place them on kitchen paper towels to absorb extra oil. While frying other batches of shingara, slightly increase the heat. Add singara and again reduce the heat.

  • Serve Aloo Phulkopir Singara hot or warm with some fried salted green chilis, tamarind chutney or coriander chutney or mint chutney or green chutney.

  • In case if you do not have panch phoran, then just add 2 pinches each of the following spices – fenugreek seeds (methi), wild celery seeds (radhuni), fennel seeds (saunf), cumin seeds (jeera), nigella seeds (kalonji).
  • Instead of wild celery seeds (radhuni) you can use carom seeds (ajwain) or mustard seeds (rai).
  • Adjust the seasonings and spices according to your taste preferences.
  • Instead of oil added when kneading the dough, you can also use ghee.
  • Omit salted peanuts if you want to make a nut-free singara version.

Nutrition Facts

Singara Recipe | Bengali Shingara

Amount Per Serving

Calories 191 Calories from Fat 99

% Daily Value*

Fat 11g17%

Saturated Fat 1g6%

Sodium 272mg12%

Potassium 168mg5%

Carbohydrates 19g6%

Fiber 2g8%

Sugar 1g1%

Protein 4g8%

Vitamin A 100IU2%

Vitamin B1 (Thiamine) 1mg67%

Vitamin B2 (Riboflavin) 1mg59%

Vitamin B3 (Niacin) 2mg10%

Vitamin B6 1mg50%

Vitamin C 12mg15%

Vitamin E 4mg27%

Vitamin K 5µg5%

Calcium 15mg2%

Vitamin B9 (Folate) 53µg13%

Iron 2mg11%

Magnesium 17mg4%

Phosphorus 51mg5%

Zinc 1mg7%

* Percent Daily Values are based on a 2000 calorie diet.

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This Singara recipe from the archives, originally published in December 2017 has been updated and republished on February 2023.



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